Posts made in August, 2011


La famille de Tiffany Morrison offre une récompense. Tiffany Morrison avait 25 ans lorsqu’elle a été vue pour la dernière fois en juin 2006. Son corps a été retrouvé l’an dernier à quelques kilomètres de l’endroit où elle avait été vue pour la dernière fois. Sa famille offre désormais une récompense pour retrouver le meurtrier de Tiffany. Tous les détails dans cette chronique de Monic Néron. Ecoutez le video...

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Justice for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (Missing Justice) & the 2110 Centre for Gender Advocacy present: –Andrea Smith on Systemic Violence against Native Women and First Nations Land Struggles: Making the Links– Friday, September 30 · 6:30pm – 8:30pm H-110, Concordia University Hall Building 1455 De Maisonneuve Ouest Montreal, QC Andrea Lee Smith is a Cherokee intellectual, feminist, and anti-violence activist. Her work focuses on issues of violence against women of color and their communities, and Native American women in particular. Smith is the co-founder of: INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence–a national grassroots organization that engages in direct action and critical dialogue; the Boarding School Healing Project–which seeks to document Native boarding school abuses so that Native communities can begin healing and demand justice; and the Chicago chapter of Women of All Red Nations. The experiences of women of color are central to both her activism and her academic work. She has worked as a rape crisis counselor, has published widely on issues of violence against women of color and is generally considered a leading expert on the topic. In 2005, Smith was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize “as a woman who works daily for peace” in recognition of her research and work regarding violence against women of color in the US. Once an assistant professor of American Culture and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Andrea Smith is presently an associate professor in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California. Childcare available with 48 hours notice // Wheelchair accessible space. // Whisper translation to French available on site. Event is free of cost. Show up early to guarantee space! More info: www.missingjustice.ca // www.centre2110.org Contact: campaigns@centre2110.org // promotions@centre2110.org // justiceformissing@gmail.com ————————–————————–—— Andrea Smith is the author of the following books: -Sacred Sites, Sacred Rites (1998) -Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (2005) -Native Americans and the Christian Right: The Gendered Politics of Unlikely Alliances (2008) Andrea Smith has edited/ co-edited the following anthologies: -The Color of Violence: The INCITE! Anthology (2006) -The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007)...

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Art by Angela Sterritt Missing Justice and the 2110 Centre for Gender Advocacy invite you to come out and show your support in Montreal this October 4th at the sixth Annual Sisters in Spirit Memorial March and Vigil. When? Tuesday, October 4th, 6pm Where? Cabot Square (Parc Atwater), corner of Atwater and St. Catherine. Metro Atwater. Bridget Tolley founded the March and Vigil in 2005, which happens every year on the anniversary of her mother’s Gladys Tolley’s death. Since then, the march has been organized all across the country on that day. In 2010, 86 marches were held in communities across Canada, the largest number yet, with one march being held as far away as Nicaragua, showing us that the problem of Indigenous women being disproportionately affected by violence is one of colonized Nations worldwide. —Invited guests include Bridget Tolley, Sue Martin, Ellen Gabriel, Melissa Dupuis, Irkar Beljaars, Anik Sioui, Harvey Michel, Cheryl Diabo, Karine Gentelet, Tiohtiake Drum, and Moe Clark.— The purpose of this event is to honour the memories of missing and murdered women and girls, raise awareness, and demand that the government support the actions of families and communities and restore research funding to Sisters in Spirit (SIS), an initiative of the Native Women’s Association of Canada which was responsible for conducting groundbreaking research between 2004 and 2010 on the now known-of cases. Although their work is far from finished, the government insists that action must take the place of research, and instead of funding the research, community work, and actions of SIS, are instead diverting resources to a generic RCMP-led missing persons database, as well as vastly facilitating police power to obtain warrants and to install wiretaps. Many believe that both of these police privileges will be used to further allow the government of Canada’s criminalization of Native communities rather than increasing the safety of Native women. 583 Native women have gone missing or have been murdered since roughly 1980 according to the Native Women’s Association of Canada. Other organizations and activists suspect that the actual number is as high as 3000. The reality is that Native women in Canada are at least five times more likely to die of violence than non-Native women. Racist and sexist government policies, stereotypes of Indigenous women, a lack of media attention, and police negligence all contribute to, and indeed perpetuate this violence as well as the general lack of data–also a form of violence in itself. While some media and public attention has been given to cases in Western Canada, Native women in Quebec have also been targeted. For instance, Gladys Tolley, in 2001, an Algonquin woman from...

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http://www.kenoradailyminerandnews.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=3252625 By Jessica Cable In June of 2008 the first Walk 4 Justice set out from Vancouver, honouring the 2,932 missing and murdered women the group had named in their database of research and demanding a national public inquiry from the government. Four years later the walkers are once again on route to Ottawa, this time, however, they’re walking for the 4,200 women they say have now been murdered or gone missing across Canada. “It doesn’t get any easier and it’s escalating. We want to stop violence against women once and for all,” said Walk 4 Justice’s co-founder Gladys Radek, whose niece disappeared in 2005 off of the Highway of Tears in Northern B.C. “What do we want? We want justice and we want it now.” Radek, along with the group’s co-founder Bernie Williams and 10 other walkers, arrived in Kenora last night, each one of them sharing tragic stories about a missing or murdered family member to a room of supporters at First Baptist Church. The group of women and men are taking their stories to rally on Parliament Hill, where they plan to arrive on Sept. 19. The group is advocating for proper support programs, education and public safety nets to be put in place. “Our own stories keep us going,” said Williams, a long-time advocate for women living in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. “You do get bitter after a while, though. You don’t see the change happening and you see the numbers increasing and you see programs for women and children getting cut and you see the systematic racism. I’m so tired of being stereotyped. These women had a right to live.” The Walk 4 Justice support vehicles are covered with photographs and details of women who have been murdered or gone missing. “We asked for permission from the families we’ve met, either from the walk, emails or rallies, to carry those pictures,” said Williams. “They’re of women from 1986 to 2011.” Since the walk began on June 21, Williams said 19 women have been murdered or gone missing. One of the most recent cases is the gruesome death of 32-year-old Roberta McIvor, whose body was found decapitated on Sandy Bay First Nation on July 30. The group of walkers visited McIvor’s family while walking through Manitoba. “For myself, it was very emotional. Roberta’s mom brought us to where they found her remains. We need to stand by her, but it was just so emotional and heavy on all of us,” said Williams, adding this year’s walk will likely be her last. “I’ve been (drawing attention to the issue) since 1986 and it’s taken a toll on...

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