Justice for Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women

A grassroots campaign based in Montreal


News and Upcoming Events

Check out some resources and join in our upcoming march

Flashmob and Dinner to Honour the Lives of Missing & Murdered Women

Flashmob and Dinner to Honour the Lives of Missing & Murdered Women

(français ci-dessous) Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 Flashmob: 5pm in downtown Montreal (the exact location will be announced the day before the event) Community Dinner: 6pm at the Native Friendship...

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Statement: Solidarity With Attawapiskat First Nation Youth and Occupy INAC

Statement: Solidarity With Attawapiskat First Nation Youth and Occupy INAC

*pic: FB Occupy INAC Victory Rally and Press Conference* Tiohtià:ke/Montreal – Missing Justice stands in solidarity with Attawapiskat First Nation and the Occupy INAC movement in their calls to...

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Missing Justice Marches, Vigils, and Events

Check out some of images and videos from our events.

A brief history of the past decade of this movement

The struggle for justice for missing and murdered Indigneous women is long and strong.

1991: The first women’s memorial march was held in response to the murder of a Coast Salish woman on Powell Street in Vancouver. Twenty-two years later, the women’s memorial march continues to honour the lives of all missing and murdered women.

October 2004: Sisters in Spirit creates a national database on missing and murdered Indigenous women. The primary goal was to conduct research and raise awareness of the alarmingly high rates of violence against Aboriginal women and girls in Canada.

October 4 2005: First annual Sisters In Spirit march and vigil, founded by Bridget Tolley on the anniversary of her mother’s death, who was killed by a Sureté du Québec squad car on Highway 105 on the Kitigan Zibi reserve.

June 2008: Walk4Justice’s first three-month walk to Ottawa. When they arrived at the Parliament in September, they presented documentation of over 3000 missing and murdered women and a petition signed by 2900 people calling for inquiries into these cases.

June 2008: Harper apologizes for residential schools and asks the forgiveness of Indigenous peoples, stating, “Today, we recognize that this policy of assimilation was wrong, has caused great harm and has no place in our country.”

Mar 2010: Funding of Sisters in Spirit, along with funding of Aboriginal Healing Foundation and many other Indigenous organizations, is cut by federal government.

2010: Families of Sisters in Spirit, a grassroots not-for-profit volunteer organization located on unceded Algonquin Territory led by families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls with support from Indigenous and non-Indigenous allies, is created.

December 2012: Idle No More sparks hundreds of teach-ins, rallies, and protests. INM calls for active resistance to violence against women and demands that a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women involving Indigenous women be held.

February 14 2013: Seven hundred people gather on Valentine’s Day for Montreal’s fourth (and largest) annual Memorial March for Missing and Murdered Women.

July 2013: Stephen Harper refuses to conduct inquiry into cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women, although calls for a national inquiry have been prominent for many years from local, national, and international bodies.

  • 1991: first memorial march
  • Oct 2004: Sisters in Spirit
  • Oct 4. 2005: First annual SIS march and vigil
  • June 2008: Walk4Justice does first three-month walk to Ottawa
  • June 2008 Harper apology
  • Mar 2010: Sisters in Spirit funding is cut by federal government.
  • 2010: Families of Sisters in Spirit is created
  • December 2012: Idle No More
  • Montreal’s 4th annual memorial march for missing and murdered women
  • July 2013: Harper refusal to do inquiry
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