Audio


With Melanie Morrison from Kahnawke, Kary Ann Deer, of PAQ and QNW, Craig Benjamin, of Amnesty International, and Yasmin Jiwani, from Concordia University. Listen to Audio Here Kary Ann Deer, of Projet Autochtones du Quebec Melanie Morrison, sister of Tiffany Morrison who went missing 3 years ago from Kahnawake. Yasmin Jiwani, former researcher and coordinator of the BC Yukon FREDA Centre for Research on Violence against Women and Children Craig Benjamin, Amnesty...

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June 18, 2009 marks the 3rd anniversary of the disappearance of  Tiffany Morrison from Kahnawake, Quebec. Tiffany, a mother in her twenties, is one of more than 500 murdered or missing Indigenous women in Canada since 1980. To preview the upcoming vigil, the June 2009 edition of No One Is Illegal Radio features an interview with Kary Ann Deer of Quebec Native Women, who is also a community member and a vigil organizer. In this photo: Kary Ann Deer performs with her women’s drum circle, Odaya, at a Missing Justice fundraiser. Listen to Interview with Kary Ann...

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For background and analysis about the campaign for justice for the more than 500 murdered, missing and disappeared indigenous women and girls in Canada since 1980, the May 2009 edition of No One Is Illegal Radio features an interview with Ellen Gabriel of the Quebec Native Women’s Association. Listen to the...

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Maisy Odjick, a 16 year-old from the Algonquin community of Kitigan Zibi near Maniwaki (Quebec) has been missing since September 8, 2008. In the words of Laurie Odjick, Maisy’s mother, the response of police services has been “incompetent, unprofessional, uncooperative [and] unaccountable.” The May 2009 edition of No One Is Illegal Radio features an interview with Laurie Odjick, who has been organizing and struggling for justice and answers in the case of her missing daughter. Laurie also wrote a public letter condemning police maplractice, below. Read the letter Listen to Audio of Laurie reading her...

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On Monday, March 16th, Beverley Jacobs came to speak at the McCord Museum in Montreal. Jacobs is the president of NWAC, an Aboriginal rights lawyer, and was a lead researcher in Amnesty International’s 2004 study Stolen Sisters: Discrimination and Violence against Indigenous Women in Canada. She also currently works to raise awareness across the country via NWAC’s Sisters in Spirit campaign. The root causes of violence against Indigenous women in Canada, from a forced shift away from the Matrilineal basis of many First Nations to patriarchal modes of determining “status,” was the crux of Jacobs’ talk. The Indian Act and the Indian Status Card are only two of many symbols of a deeply flawed change of direction that has caused First Nations communities, but particularly the women, to suffer brutally. Jacobs comes from the Mohawk Bear Clan in Six Nations, Grand River, and has a deep sense of history which she shared with those who came out to listen. Montreal is part of her traditional territory and the one request she made of her audience at the end of the night was: “Learn about the land you’re living on. Learn about its history.” Seeing as how one can’t find such historical knowledge in the educatioonal system, her words resonated deeply; a more personal kind of challenge was felt by many and seemingly embraced. In the photo directly above, Jacobs holds a Two Row Wampum Belt. The two rows represent Native and White cultures co-existing side-by-side without interfering in each others’ way of life. Jacobs sees the agreement as profoundly violated, but only by one party. Also in this picture: Kevin Daniels, National Chief of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples. To hear Beverley Jacobs speak in Montreal, click here:...

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