Shannon Alexander


PAST EVENT: 6-9pm Saturday Sept 6th,  Home Hardware in Kitigan Zibi Starts at Home Hardware ends at Nishkadadowin Park near Chateau Logue. Guest Speakers will be saying a few words. Water will be available at start and end of walk. It’s going to be 6yrs that our Girls have missing.  We still have no answers, all we have is hope that one day we will have closure. Please come out and show your support for the families and Maisy &...

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Saturday, October 23 · 7:00am – 5:00pm Kitigan Zibi Anishanabeg First Nation (Maniwaki, Quebec) Volunteers will gather at the Cultural Center across from the Home Hardware on highway 105 in Kitigan Zibi, Quebec (1 and a half hour north of Ottawa, ON). Volunteers are asked to be there at 7am for instruction and the first team will leave at 7:30am. However we expect the majority of volunteers to come at 8:30am. We will be having a spaghetti dinner for all the volunteers. A bus will be available for a small voluntary contribution. It will leave from Ottawa, ON and take volunteers to Kitigan Zibi, QC and will return to Ottawa when the search is complete. Please email me if you are interested in taking the bus at mjacko@findmaisyandshannon.com. There are 4 billets available for out-of-towners. Please email (or fb message Lynda K) to lkitchikeesic@yahoo.com to arrange to stay in KZ on Friday night. Meegwetch to everyone. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=492013555408&set=a.472043635408.269832.674550408&ref=fbx_album#!/event.php?eid=155493131151933 Website:...

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To commemorate two years since they disappeared Monday, September 6, 7 pm Location: Home Hardware in Kitigan Zibi, QC on route 105 Walk and Candlelight Vigil for Maisy and Shannon in Kitigan Zibi, QC The Walk will start at 79 Kicihi Mikan (Home Hardware) on route 105 and go straight through town on the main street to the river, then walk by Woodland school up to Nagishkodadiwin Park across from the Chateau Logue Hotel. We will end with an address from the following: Opening Prayer By Elder Pauline Decontie & song by KZ Women Drum Group (Sue Thran) Drumming by …Eagle River SPEAKERS: Chief Gilbert Whiteduck Corporal Wayne Russett, Aboriginal & Ethnic Liaison Officer, RCMP Sisters in Spirit Odjick & Alexander Families Light Candles and have a moment of silence Closing Prayer By Elder Pauline Decontie and song by Willy Mitchell Drumming by Eagle River Please consult www.findmaisyandshannon.com for more...

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Sunday, September 6, 2009 Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm Location: Kitigan Zibi at the Home Hardware Street: 79 Kichi Mikan City/Town: Maniwaki, QC Phone: 819-441-3055 email: mjacko@findmaisyandshannon.com We will be starting from Home Hardware and walking through town to Nagishkodadiwin Park across from the Chateau Logue. You can choose to drive or just meet at Nagishkodadiwin Park. Complete information at...

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September 2, 2009 The disappearance of two teenage girls in Maniwaki, Que., one year ago has left a painful void in their families and their small Algonquin community. Maisy Odjick, 16, and Shannon Alexander, 17, were last seen on Sept. 6, 2008. A year later, Odjick’s clothes, her flute, her camera and treasured photos are still where she left them at the home of her grandparents, where she usually stayed. “I’ve kept everything the way it was when she left here, when she disappeared … hoping that she’ll come home or that she’ll call and let me know that she’s alive somewhere,” her grandmother Lisa Odjick said, wiping tears from her cheeks. “Not knowing if she’s alive or dead, that’s the hardest thing.” Quebec provincial police declined to comment earlier this week about the case, but they were scheduled to hold a news conference about it in Ottawa with the Ontario Provincial Police on Thursday morning. At Lisa Odjick’s cream-coloured bungalow on the Kitigan Zibi Anishnabeg First Nation reserve, about 145 kilometres north of Ottawa, there is still a pillow on the arm of the brown fold-out couch where Maisy slept, and her clothes are still in the white cupboard in the corner. Her family got a cake for her last birthday and put gifts under the tree for her at Christmas in case she came home, her grandmother recalled. “But she didn’t come home. Now another birthday’s coming up and she’s going to be 18, and still no word,” her grandmother sobbed. “And it’s hard. It’s so hard.” On Sunday, a march and candlelight vigil will be held to commemorate the girls’ disappearance, organized by Maisy’s mother, Laurie Odjick. At an apartment in nearby Maniwaki, Shannon Alexander’s father Bryan said he has been waiting by the phone for months, hoping someone who knows the girls’ whereabouts will call. “My whole family’s torn up,” he said. Lisa Odjick said nothing seemed amiss when she last saw Maisy, who was heading out to a dance with her friend on Saturday night. “She was all happy when she left here with Shannon,” Odjick recalled, saying the girls had only known each other for a few weeks but were already very close. Odjick asked Maisy to call on Sunday, but grew worried when she didn’t hear from her. She went over to Bryan Alexander’s place, where the girls had planned to spend the night. Alexander said he had originally left for the weekend to paint Shannon’s brother’s house, but returned a day early. “I was spooked, there was no answer in the house,” he said. He found the doors locked and the...

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The search for Maisy and Shannon continues by Maya Rolbin-Ghanie and Dru Oja Jay see photo essay – http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/2694 KITIGAN ZIBI ANISHINABEG–Maisy Odjick, 17, and her friend Shannon Alexander, now 18, vanished from Shannon’s father’s apartment in Maniwaki, Quebec, September 6, 2008. Both are from Kitigan Zibi, an Algonquin reserve adjacent to Maniwaki. Since September, neither the Kitigan Zibi Police Services nor the Sûreté du Québec has collected any evidence pertaining to the whereabouts of the two girls. When Maisy and Shannon vanished, their wallets and their money were left behind. The police are not ruling out the possibility that the two girls are “runaways.” In addition, the police have repeatedly neglected to communicate with and report back to the two families. The little media attention this case has attracted may be attributed to the constant and determined efforts at media outreach by Maisy’s mother, Laurie Odjick. The two ground searches since the disappearance – December 7, 2008, and May 2, 2009 – were led by Search and Rescue Global 1; both times the Odjick family was the main organizer. According to Search Leader Lawrence Conway, the search for Maisy and Shannon is the first family-organized search he has ever taken part in. Normally, the police call rescue teams and arrange searches. Indigenous women in Canada are five times more likely than other women to die as the result of violence. The official number of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada since 1980 is 520, two-thirds of whom were murdered and about one-quarter of whom are still missing. Roughly half of these murders and disappearances occurred in the last nine years and over 300 cases are as of yet unsolved. Indigenous grassroots activists and communities put the number of cases closer to 1800. Amnesty International, the United Nations, and the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) have all put forth comprehensive recommendations to the Canadian government to address the violence and discrimination faced by Indigenous women, but so far no action has been taken beyond a small amount of funding allotted for research. NWAC President Beverley Jacobs points out that even working with a number like 520, taken proportionately that “would equal 18,000 women among Canada’s white population. If there were 18,000 white women missing and murdered, it would be headlines. There would be something done...

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