Shannon Alexander


By Brendan Kennedy, The Ottawa Citizen May 13, 2009 The bones found near Maniwaki on Saturday — raising suspicions they might be part of the remains of two teenage girls missing from the area for more than eight months — were determined by a Montreal lab to have come from an animal. The bones were found beside Highway 107, near Highway 117, in Grand-Remous, and reported to the Sureté du Québec, which sent them to be analysed. Maisy Odjick, 17, and Shannon Alexander, 18, were last seen in the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation-Maniwaki area on Sept. 5. Their families have been frustrated by a lack of clues as to their whereabouts. The files are being jointly investigated by the Kitigan Zibi Police Department and the Sûreté, because Maisy comes from the reserve and Shannon’s home is off it. Their families have offered a $10,000 reward. Anyone with information is asked to call the Sûreté du Québec at 819-310-4141 or the Kitigan Zibi Police Department at 819-449-6000. Maisy Odjick is six feet tall, 125 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair. She has two piercings in her bottom lip and one in her left nostril, and scars on top of her right eyebrow and left forearm. Shannon Alexander is five-foot-nine, 145 pounds, with brown eyes and dark brown hair. She has acne and pierced ears, often wears a silver necklace with a feather on it, and has a scar on her left...

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http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/determine+bones+found+near+Maniwaki+human/1584417/story.html The Ottawa Citizen May 11, 2009 OTTAWA — Quebec provincial police have sent bones found near Maniwaki, where two teenaged girls disappeared last summer, for lab analysis to see whether they are human.The bones were found by Kitigan-Zibi police about 8:15 p.m. Saturday, and they called in the provincial police. The bones were found beside Road 107 near Road 117 in Grand-Remous. A police spokesman in Montreal didn’t know who first noticed the bones. It was too late at night to investigate the scene, so officers stayed there all night. On Sunday morning more investigators arrived from Montreal to take photos and remove the bones. They’ve been sent for lab analysis, but for the moment no one knows whether they are human or from an animal. Maisy Odjick, 17, and Shannon Alexander, 18, were last seen in the area on Sept. 5, 2008. Their family has been frustrated by the lack of clues to their disappearance. Police said it will take several days at least to get information about the bones. © Copyright (c) The Ottawa...

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On may 2nd, the search for Maisy Odjick and Shannon Alexander continued, on the Kitigan Zibi reserve, 8 months after the two girls went missing. The search was organized by the Odjick family, with the help of Amnesty International, which donated  2 buses to help transport volunteers from Ottawa who wished to help with the search. The two buses were filled, and many more showed up on top of that. All in all, over 240 people came to help scour the woods around the reserve for any clue at all that might lead to answers. Four member of the Missing Justice collective in Montreal attended. The search was led by Search and Rescue Global 1, a pro-search team run entirely by volunteers. The SAR team was overwhelmed by the number of volunteers, so some people had to wait in the community hall for their turn to join a search team. We were divided into groups of 15-20 people, with 2 team leaders. Everyone had a stick of some kind to help them push aside some of the thick brush that we would encounter. We lined up for instructions: we were to yell ‘stop ‘ along with a number we had been given whenever we saw anything that might be a clue. A clue could be anything at all: a beer bottle, a piece of cloth, strange litter, anything.Then, a team leader would come and find us, look at the clue, and maybe choose to radio it in. At times distracted by nightmarish visions of what we might find, at times pre-occupied with getting through the insanely thick bush unscathed, we walked through the woods, in as straight a line as possible given the fact that we were supposed to go through all obstacles as opposed to around them. There were a few times when we lost site of the people beside us, but it was never long before someone yelled ‘stop.’ Nothing of interest was found, and even with 240 volunteers searching from early morning until dark, only a small fraction of the land was covered. Talking to people during breaks, and while eating, revealed that people had very different political backgrounds and ideas about violence against First Nations women, and about Maisy and Shannon’s case in particular, but the common link was always: it’s horrible; answers are need. We were extremely well-fed that day, as numerous volunteers from the community had generously prepared mountains of food for us all. It struck me, how every aspect of the search was volunteer-run, except for the few police who were hanging around. I spoke to a member of the Search and...

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Maisy Odjick and Shannon Alexander have been missing from Maniwaki, QC since September 2008. Please join in a search led by Search and Rescue Global 1. For more information and to find out how to get involved, go to:...

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Maisy Odjick, 16, (left) and Shannon Alexander, 17, (right) went missing from their reserve, Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation (close to Maniwaki and Ottawa) on September 5th, 2008, just days before the Walk4Justice rally hit Ottawa. Numerous First Nations women and men had just walked from Vancouver to Ottawa to raise awareness about violence aganist Indigenous girls and women, and they arrived at parliament with a list of 3000 names of missing and murdered women that they had compiled along the way, only to discover there were two more names to add to the list. The list was presented to the government (one of Harper’s aids), and was accompanied by a call for an inquiry into the many unresolved, uninvestigated, untalked about cases. Maisy Odjick is about six-feet tall and weighs 119 to 125 pounds. She has short brown hair, a pierced left nostril and two piercings on her lower lip. Shannon Alexander is five-foot-nine, weighs around 145 pounds and has brown eyes and short, dark-brown hair. She has facial acne, pierced ears and wears a silver necklace with a feather on it. Despite the fact that both girls’ belongings, including their wallets with money still inside, were left behind, police spent months speculating about whether or not they had run away, and several “sightings” were apparently had in various Ontario towns in recent months. None of these sightings have been confirmed, however, and no real information on either of the girls’ whereabouts has yet been found. Their disappearance is viewed as highly suspicious. Their families continue to worry and live with horrible uncertatinty. If you have any information about the whereabouts of Maisy or Shannon, please call 1-819-449-6000 to contact the band police department. For more information, or to donate money for a reward, visit...

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